Explore The Clifton StrengthsFinder Talent Theme – Connectedness

What Is The Clifton StrengthsFinder Talent Theme of Connectedness?

Often people will ask us, "What does it mean to have the Connectedness Strength?" First, know that StrengthsFinder will help you figure out your potential. We call them natural talents or natural patterns. We know you're here because you want to turn them into superpowers in your career, so here's the gist: People strong in the Connectedness theme have faith in the links between all things. They believe there are few coincidences and that almost every event has a reason.

Gallup®, Clifton StrengthsFinder®, StrengthsFinder®, and each of the 34 Clifton StrengthsFinder theme names are trademarks of Gallup, Inc.

Connectedness - Learn From Others

These 10-15 minute "Theme Overview" videos give you a peek into the awesomeness of your talent theme. They also explore the idea that talent themes represent potential, yet if they are not invested in, they might show up looking raw and unproductive at work.
These "Talent Testimonials" videos are real people sharing their experiences with this talent theme. Although you may apply your talent in a different way at work, it's helpful to hear how others use the same natural patterns of thinking, feeling, or acting at work.

Your Strengths Will Strengthen Your Performance At Work

In the next section, you'll explore what fuels you up and what drains you. Just like gas (or petrol) in your car, you need to keep your personal tank full to be at your best. Each StrengthsFinder talent theme is energized and drained by different things. When you see the stick figure who looks strong, you can consider how these things fuel you up at work. They're your energy makers. When you see the stick figure who looks weak, consider if these things are draining you at work. They're your energy takers.

Connectedness Yucks

What's a Yuck?

It's a situation, condition, or behavior you might see at work that zaps your energy. Yucks are also things you see on your calendar or to do list that make you think, "yuck, if I never had to do that again I'd be thrilled."

 

Yuck Situations for Connectedness

  • Closed mindedness or when people refuse to see that issues impact more that just us.
  • Experiencing an us vs them mentality because we all have a ripple effect on each other.

Example yuck from client: "I believe that the universe offers us a lot of wisdom if we will listen. In my last job, one of my teammates made fun of me for being "woo woo." I know that he is analytical and that data is his truth. For me, the only truth is wonder and curiosity. In order to get along, I changed the words I used at work, and I ignored insights from my intuition. Looking back, I know I would have had a bigger impact if I hadn't pushed my Connectedness away as if it didn't belong at work."

Connectedness When Starved

What's a Starved Talent?

This section describes how you might be perceived when the shadow side of your talent is showing. It’s when you’re overusing, misapplying, or squashing down one of your natural talents rather than investing in it to turn it into a strength. We often see people starve, squash, or ignore their talent when they assume it is not valued in that role or company culture. 

Perceptions of Starved Connectedness

  • Flaky
  • Out of touch
  • Not realistic

Connectedness - How To Insult It

What's An Insulted Talent?

Usually talents get offended or insulted by other people who have natural preferences that are different from yours. It also happens if they fail to see their actions have an impact on someone else (you!). You can also insult your own talents if you have a "troublemaker strength" that speaks loudly and overpowers this one.

Things That Will Insult Connectedness

  • Shut down possibilities and tell this person there's only one rigid path.
  • Isolate this person from other humans. Connectedness thrives on relationships, so pulling them away from the community will squash their Connectedness.

If you're solely focused on facts, figures, and data, keep a close eye on those who lead with Connectedness. The inability to connect the human race into the picture will feel limiting. They get satisfaction when things are acknowledged as borderless and timeless, so trying to stuff them in a box will feel stifling.

Connectedness Yays

What's a Yay?

It's a situation at work that boosts up your energy or makes you feel productive. Yays are also things you see on your calendar or to do list that make you think, “yay, fill my days with this."

 

Yay Situations for Connectedness

  • Getting to integrate parts into a whole - seeing how people and ideas map together.
  • Exploring the mystery in things, and seeing the threads of commonality.

Example yay from client: "A great week for me feels like the movie 'The Lion King.' I'm all about the circle of life. The same concepts apply at work, yet people rarely bring this mindful approach. I hold the space for our team to know that our contribution means something bigger. I feel really motivated when I feel seen and heard, and when I can help other people feel seen and heard. Just like everything, it has a ripple effect. It's fun to know I created a positive ripple."

Connectedness When Fed

What's a Fed Talent?

This section describes how you might be perceived when the best version of you shows up at work. It’s when you’ve invested in your natural talents to mature them into strengths. You can feed your talent by considering “how” you approach each “what” on the job. When you apply your talents to productive outcomes, you’re feeding them.

Perceptions of Fed Connectedness

  • Brings inherent unity into clear view
  • Highly present in every conversation - is fully "right here right now"
  • Shows links among ideas and people

Connectedness - How To Honor It

What's An Honored Talent?

Usually talents feel honored when other people acknowledge your needs and potential contributions. Talents feel honored when someone “extends an olive branch” to help you work at your best. You can also honor your own talents by investing in them, by choosing work that naturally calls on them, or by applying your strengths to performance on the job. 

Things That Will Honor Connectedness

  • Help them find their tribe at work, and to be in community with others.
  • Acknowledge the bigger purpose to share how you're all part of something bigger than each person.

To unleash the A-game of someone who leads through the Connecteness talent theme, give the person the freedom to establish a broad network at the office. They thrive on the relationships, and can help your team see things about other teams or departments you've never had an awareness about. Their inner harmony can create calm in a place of chaos. Their systems thinking and design thinking are useful for complex projects.

Personal Brand - "How" Connectedness Operates At Work

Most people have a good handle on "What" they bring to the workplace. Resumes, CVs, and career development conversations are filled with lists of skills and job titles that show "what" you can do. Nearly everyone misses the "How".

Your Clifton StrengthsFinder talent themes help you communicate "How" you show up. It's how you think. It's how you feel. It's how you act. These are huge differences in each person that are differentiators on the job. Consider these adjectives you might want to consciously put into your personal branding efforts.

We recommend working a "How" description into the Summary section in your LinkedIn profile (if you don't yet use that section, don't worry, most people haven't paid attention to it until now). Of course, make up adjectives or phrases that describe you at your best. Try to avoid words like "motivated, self-starter" because they're so overused that you'll blend in with everyone else. Here are some ideas to spark your thinking:

  • Intergrator
  • Idea-connector
  • Bridge-Builder
  • Comforter
  • Faithful
  • Listener
  • Perceptive
  • Unifier
  • Ambitious
  • Intense
  • Driven
  • Independent

How To Invest In Your Connectedness Talent On The Job

  • Schedule time for meditation or contemplation. Reflect upon: how your religious beliefs affirm your sense of connection to others; how your sense of connection gives you stability through your faith in people; the role of coincidences in your life
  • Make a list of the experiences that support your sense of connection. Try new ones, such as starting a book club, attending a retreat, or joining an organization that puts Connectedness into practice.
  • Within your organization, help your colleagues understand how their efforts fit in the larger picture. You can be a leader in building teams and helping people feel important.
  • Help those around you cope with unpredictable and unexplainable events. In particular, you can help people find meaning in even sickness and death. Your perspective will bring comfort.
  • Partner with someone with a strong Communication theme. This person can help you with the words you need to describe vivid examples of connection in the real world.
  • Don’t spend too much time attempting to persuade others to see the world as a linked web. Be aware that your sense of connection is intuitive. If others don’t share your intuition, rational argument will not persuade them.

Tips For Managing Someone Who Leads Through The Connectedness Talent

  • This person will likely have social beliefs that she will defend strongly. Listen closely to know what these issues are. Your acceptance of these issues will influence the depth of relationship you can build with her.
  • She is likely to have a spiritual orientation and perhaps a strong faith. Your knowledge and, at the very least, acceptance of her spiritual position will enable her to become increasingly comfortable around you.
  • Encourage this person to build bridges to the different groups in your organization. She naturally thinks about how things are connected, so she should excel at showing different people how each relies on the others. Properly positioned, she can be a team builder in your company.
  • She may be very receptive to thinking about and developing the mission for your organization. She likes to feel part of something larger than herself.
  • If you are also strong in Connectedness, share articles, writings, and experiences with her. You can reinforce each other’s focus.

What To Consider When Partnering With A Colleague Who Leads Through Connectedness

  • When you need to break down silos across teams, partner with a person who leads through Connectedness. They will be able to see how people and ideas are linked to each other. They can often find dependencies and mutually-beneficial connections that others cannot readily see.
  • Even if you don't trust and use your intuition as an input to your decisions, be open to what it brings to someone with the Connectedness talent theme. This person usually has a next-level spidey sense, especially about people.
  • When you need to exercise deep listening on a project, consider partnering with your colleague with the Connectedness talent. This talent theme brings people a strong I'm-right-here-right-now-with-you vibe. They make others feel, "I'm 100% in this conversation, and you have all of my attention." In our highly distracted, device-driven work lives, someone with Connectedness can offer full presence to the team.

Listen To The Lead Through Strengths Podcast